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Cosmopolitans: The History of Jewish San Francisco

This course was offered in Winter/Spring, 2017.

CosmopolitansfGertrude Stein. Levi Strauss. Adolph Sutro. Emperor Norton. Jews have been a prominent part of San Francisco since the Gold Rush. In many ways, the Jewish experience in the Bay Area has been different from the rest of the United States. Jewish San Franciscans have been part of a highly variegated population, and the interactions among Jewish residents with their Asian, Latino, and Black neighbors have taken unique forms here. Similarly, there has also been an unusually pronounced variation among the city’s Jewish inhabitants themselves. These factors, in combination with relatively less overt forms of anti-Semitism in the Bay Area than has been found in many other parts of the country, has resulted in the emergence of a truly distinctive Jewish community – not only in religious life, but also in terms of broader contributions to the Bay Area, particularly in the arenas of business, the arts and struggles for social justice.

This program will take place at the Hewlett Teaching Center.

Free visitor parking after 4:00 pm (unless otherwise noted next to a location):

  • Around the Oval on Palm Drive (free after 6:00 pm)
  • Roth Way, Lomita Drive, and Museum Way, next to the Rodin Sculpture Garden [slightly northeast of Hewlett]
  • Via Ortega Garage. Street address: 285 Panama Street, Stanford CA 94305 [southwest of Hewlett]

Schedule

# Sessions
1
Date & time

Thursday, February 16
7:30 - 9:00 pm

Tuition
Free
Session Time Days Location Instructors
Feb 16 7:30 PM–9:00 PM Thu Stanford University Fred Rosenbaum

Location

Stanford University

450 Serra Mall

Stanford, CA 94305

Instructors

Fred Rosenbaum

Fred Rosenbaum Fred Rosenbaum, founding director of Lehrhaus Judaica, has written four books on Bay Area Jewish history and three books on the Holocaust. He has taught numerous courses on the history of contemporary Israel at Lehrhaus and the University of San Francisco. He has been awarded the S.Y. Agnon Gold Medal for Intellectual Excellence by the Scopus Society of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the Covenant Award for Exceptional Jewish Educators, as well as the Anne and Robert Cowan Writers’ Award for making an exceptional impact on the Bay Area by writing on Jewish themes.