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Stepchildren of the Shtetl: A Lecture with Natan Meir

This course was offered in Fall, 2017.

Natan Meir discusses the topic of his forthcoming scholarly book Stepchildren of the Shtetl: The Destitute, Disabled, and Demented of Jewish Eastern Europe. He will present an analysis of Jewish society in 19th– and early 20th–century eastern Europe based on the experiences of and attitudes towards beggars, vagrants, disabled people, and the mentally ill and offers a new lens through which to view Russian and Polish Jewry: the lives of the marginalized.

Schedule

# Sessions
1
Date & time

Thursday, November 16
7:00 pm

Tuition
Free
Session Time Days Location Instructors
Nov 16 7:00 PM–8:30 PM Thu Jewish Community Library Natan Meir

Location

Jewish Community Library

1835 Ellis Street

San Francisco, CA 94115

415-567-3327

The Library is located between Scott and Pierce on the campus of the Jewish Community High School. There is a free and secure parking garage accessible from Pierce Street; buzz the intercom, announce that you’re coming to the Library, and the gate will go up. For more information call (415) 567-3327.

Instructors

Natan Meir

Natan MeirNatan M. Meir is the Lorry I. Lokey Associate Professor of Judaic Studies at Portland State University. His research interest is modern Jewish history, focusing on the social and cultural history of East European Jewry in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He is the author of Kiev, Jewish Metropolis: A History, 1859-1914, co-editor of Anti-Jewish Violence: Rethinking the Pogrom in East European History, and served as an academic consultant for the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center of Moscow. He is now completing a study exploring the lives and roles of the outcasts of East European Jewish society in the modern period up to the Holocaust.