Dismiss

Please upgrade to a newer browser.

The Lehrhaus website works best in modern browsers like Internet Explorer 8, Firefox 4, Google Chrome 10, Safari 3 and newer. If you are not using one of these, you may encounter visual glitches or other problems.

Death and Mourning for the Jew by Choice

This course was offered in Winter/Spring, 2016.

House of Mourning siddurAt some point we all lose loved ones. The person who has converted to Judaism will eventually be faced with mourning a non-Jewish relative. What is appropriate behavior for a Jewish mourner who has lost a non-Jewish loved one? What are the options for dealing with funeral masses, "visitations" at funeral homes, and the funeral itself? What about Jewish mourning practices, shiva and sheloshim? The potential for isolation is great, but certainly isolation is not what Jewish tradition seeks for a mourner!

A member of an interfaith family may have some of the same questions. How do I honor my loved one yet find comfort for myself?

Join Rabbi Ruth Adar for a two session class that is open to anyone interested in grieving in a multi-faith family with a special focus on how a Jewish convert may honor their non-Jewish loved ones and their own feelings and adopted tradition.

The first session will meet at Temple Sinai and will address the basics of Jewish mourning. The second session will be in a private home in San Leandro where Rabbi Adar will model a home observing shiva. Students will be able to ask hands on questions, to see and hold the objects associated with shiva.

Schedule

# Sessions
2
Date & time

Thursdays, February 4 - 11
7:30 - 9:00 pm

Tuition
$15
Session Time Days Location Instructors
Feb 04 7:30 PM–9:00 PM Thu Temple Sinai Rabbi Ruth Adar
Feb 11 7:30 PM–9:00 PM Thu Private Home - San Leandro Rabbi Ruth Adar

Locations

A Private Home in San Leandro

San Leandro, CA

Temple Sinai

2808 Summit Street

Oakland, CA 94609

510-451-3263

Instructors

Rabbi Ruth Adar

Rabbi Ruth AdarRabbi Ruth Adar's passion is making Judaism accessible to beginners from all backgrounds via classroom teaching and home practice. Rabbi Adar holds a B.A. in Economics from the University of Tennessee, an M.A. in Religious Studies from the University of Chicago, and an M.A. in Hebrew Letters from Hebrew Union College in Los Angeles. She is a member of the Central Conference of American Rabbis. Rabbi Adar has been a resident of the Bay Area since 1986. She blogs as the Coffee Shop Rabbi at http://CoffeeShopRabbi.com.